IAPAC 2016 Presentation: Daily Text Message Responses as Compared to Retrospective Self Report of Antiretroviral Adherence among HIV-infected Methamphetamine Users

Dr. David J. Moore recently presented “Daily Text Message Responses as Compared to Retrospective Self Report of Antiretroviral Adherence among HIV-infected Methamphetamine Users” at the 11th International Conference on HIV Treatment and Prevention Adherence (IAPAC). Among a sample of individuals living with HIV and who reported recent methamphetamine (METH) use, responses to text messages sent as medication prompts were significantly associated with an objective “gold standard” for measuring medication adherence (i.e., Medication Event Monitoring System; MEMS).

 

The findings from this study suggest that daily text message responses may be able to serve as a proxy for adherence to Antiretroviral therapy (ART) medication among persons living with HIV. ART adherence is critical for both large-scale public health initiatives and individual well being (e.g., decreasing the risk of opportunistic infections). As technologies for daily monitoring of adherence evolve, there are continued opportunities to assess and intervene upon difficulties with ART adherence in real time, and potentially address them prior to patients exhibiting clinical concerns (e.g., detectable viral loads) and poor health outcomes.

 Rooney AS, Umlauf A, Gouaux B, Heaton AE, Montoya JL, and Moore DJ. (2016). Daily Text Message Responses as Compared to Retrospective Self Report of Antiretroviral Adherence among HIV-infected Methamphetamine Users. 11th International Conference on HIV Treatment and Prevention Adherence (IAPAC), Fort Lauderdale, FL.

Sponsored by NIH/NIDA P50DA026306

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